“Far From the Heart works to successfully increase students’ knowledge and shift attitudes.”

We’re excited to release a new research paper in collaboration with the Community Research Unit (CRU) of the University of Regina. The research examined data collected on the Far From the Heart (FFTH) tour in Saskatchewan in the fall of 2011.

The research found that FFTH used “an innovative approach that challenges youth to speak and act out their thoughts and attitudes surrounding dating violence.”

The author, Candice Kloeble, has her Bachelor of Social Work degree from the University of Regina and is currently completing a Master’s of Education with the Critical Environmental Education Cohort at the University of Saskatchewan. Our thanks go to Candice, our advisory panel, planning committee, the CRU and of course the students, teachers, community facilitators and funding partners who made FFTH such a success.

Click here to download the research paper.

sexetc:

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5 notes

That is exactly what street harassment is: making women feel like objects, making women feel like the reason they are outside is so that men can enjoy looking at their bodies, making women afraid to go outside. It is really a terrifying thing, feeling like you are a tiny little thing next to a big group of men who could attack you, and who do very frequently take harassment beyond sly whispers and low-pitched whistles. It is terrible to constantly be reminded that there are so many people physically bigger than you who could harm you and who feel the need to remind you of their power through harassment every time you go outside. It makes you feel helpless, it is belittling, it is objectifying.

96 notes

One of the worst ways to stop someone from telling sexist jokes is to tell him the joke isn’t funny. He’ll assume that you’re humorless and that he needs to save the good stuff for the right audience. If you really want someone to stop telling sexist jokes, you need to tell him, “I don’t get it” and then step back as he tries not to say, “It’s funny because women are stupid.”

If This Isn’t From a Book, It Should Be (via gaircyrch)

Oh my god, I’m gonna have to try this it’s brilliant. I’ve been doing it wrong this whole time.

(via stfufauxminists)

I’ve done this (it’s been so long I can’t remember what came seeing this quote or responding that way), but let me tell you it works. Just stare at them all blankly and say “what do you mean?” Works every time. 

(via iamateenagefeminist)

26,119 notes

face-down-asgard-up:

thosepeskydames:

TRIGGER WARNING: SEXUAL ASSAULT/RAPE.

A Kentucky girl who was sexually assaulted could face contempt of court charges after she tweeted the names of her juvenile attackers.

Savannah Dietrich, the 17-year-old victim, was frustrated by a…

550 notes

bookofblues:

The story of how one young woman was recently sexually assulated at 3:30 pm in Dupont Circle in broad daylight. 

What’s appalling about this, and what has me terribly up in arms, are the comments on this story that entirely miss the point. I know, anonymous online commenters can be worse than a middle school lunch table on a Friday, but I thought we had made so much progress in the last 18 months toward broad acceptance of the rule that YOU DONT TOUCH PEOPLE WITHOUT CONSENT, POINT BLANK, AND ANY CULTURE THAT TOLERATES THIS EVEN FOR A SECOND IS SLIPPING. And make no mistake, any culture that has zero recourse towards catcallers is one that not only permits, but encourages the physical equivalent of catcalling: sexual assault. We know assault is about power, not sex; we know it’s been worse recently as women ascend to more powerful positions and levels of education, and as traditional gender roles are challenged in the workplace, resulting in loss of jobs and authority for many men; we know there have been a few movements to put a full stop to catcalling and that many, many streets in America are dangerous ones, not only for women but children and any passerby (Chicago, I’m looking at you). DC is one of the worst offenders for street harassment and the truly moving part of Liz Gorman’s article is not that she was assaulted but the attitude with which she walks down the street when alone - the same way I do - calculating risk with every passing male. I don’t want to do it anymore. It’s exhausting. It’s not at all the same as just being smart and safe like anyone must in a city - like any male must in a city. It requires constant processing of your surroundings, decisions about if and when to walk or take the bus alone, evaluation of threats, all while someone is LITERALLY yelling (or worse, whispering) uninvited, explicit or lewd comments at your person. I don’t want to do it anymore. I want to give up. 

And make no mistake, comments like the ones on this story are enabling a culture that refuses to place blame where it is due: on the aggressor. Some challenge her allegations in the first place (missing the point); some complain that men are so easily victimized by the justice system when any woman cries rape (SO FALSE, and even if that outlandish claim were true, it barely makes a dent in the number of assaulters that walk free); some say it’s not a “big deal” and she’s actually lucky if this is the worst that happens to her. Oh my God. What is it going to take for people to stop — STOP — defending any evidence of power inequalities between women and men. There is not one instance where they are okay. It’s not a “big deal” that a total stranger put his hands up her skirt against her will? What if it hadn’t been sexual, and she was a dude walking down the street, and this man came up on his bike and shoved the dude to the ground? I THINK THAT WOULD BE CONSIDERED ASSAULT AND TERMS FOR RECOURSE. It’s not about sex! It’s not about whether he slapped her in the face or stuck his tongue down her throat or kicked her knees out from under her or came up behind her on a dance floor and grabbed her without permission (by the way, the worst. dance. move. ever). It is entirely about touching someone when they didn’t explicitly say you could, and it is about living in a world where a smart, working professional (or any human, but again, the power dynamics are striking) has to walk the streets in fear that a fellow human being will, at minimum, cause her to feel immensely threatened and wary. There are basic human rights that apply to each individual in the United States out of the sheer fact that each person operates as a free individual, with free will and choice, free to pursue their own happiness and unhappiness, WITHIN a system that recognizes we all have to share the same space and breathe the same air. It’s as basic as common respect/the golden rule, and it’s so fundamental that its surprising it needs to be said, but here we are, where a woman writes of a bad experience she had that is based in her experience as a routinely victimized woman on the street, and the reaction is somewhere along the muddled lines of “I’m not sure why this is a news article…”

This event is news because it is a common problem that we are entirely in control of ending and we have decided not to. That, like street harassment itself, betrays all logic. 

1. You don’t get physical. 

2. The world does not owe you something just because you’re a man and suddenly women are making more money than you. Or because they ignore you. Or because you hate them for reasons that really lie within your own place in the world.

3. You are not born with the RIGHT to access women. Or any other person besides yourself. Access means physical and conversational engagement, and catcalling is not a conversation starter. 

4. Everyone is allowed to walk wherever they want in public space without an expectation of repercussion. 

5. Every time someone, or more commonly, a group of people, catcalls a woman walking alone it is another chip in the armor of womankind as a whole, taking us down a notch, reminding the victim and anyone around her who really runs the world. The horrifying thing is that this arguably works. 

CEK

10 notes

myothello:

Think your relationship is healthy?  Take the healthy relationships quiz to find out!

1 note

hoveringbadger:

Nearly everytime I go outside out of my neighborhood I get some asshole hanging out of their car yelling or making lewd gestures at me. Now, I have the sex appeal of a squirrel so I can’t imagine how much attractive women must get.

I’m not sure why men do this. Maybe they think it’s a compliment or maybe they’re just trying to make women uncomfortable, I don’t know, but they need to realize that street harassment is legitimately frightening. Every time someone shouts at me I am afraid because I know they if they wanted to, they could physically overpower me. 

I shouldn’t have to worry about walking down a street by myself. I shouldn’t be objectified. I shouldn’t have to deal with this shit. I shouldn’t be afraid.

So guys, please don’t harass women on the street, from your car, whatever. It is not a compliment. It is objectifying and frightening and it is never okay.

(Source: gnarleyquinnx)

14 notes

jenerally:

thecsph:

deviantfemme:

[trigger warning: sexual assault; rape]
pieceinthepuzzlehumanity:

campaignofdistractions:

“The monetary cost for a rape victim to receive treatment at a hospital in the United States.”

This should be fucking free.

Actually, in almost every state, it is free to the victim. Usually, it’s paid by the state’s Victims Assistance Program and/or covered by their Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program if the victim doesn’t have health insurance that will cover it. You can also opt to not use your health insurance (for example, for college students who don’t want their parents to find out) if needed.
Additional medications, if needed afterwards, are also paid for by the Victims Assistance Program as well. 
Edited to Add: I hate when these things get reblogged without commentary that lets victims of sexual assault know that there are options. I would hate if someone saw something like this on tumblr and decided not to seek medical treatment, get tested, or get any necessary medications because they are under the false impression that they will have to pay $4.5k for these services.

^Very important commentary.

I’ve seen this reblogged more without this commentary than with.

jenerally:

thecsph:

deviantfemme:

[trigger warning: sexual assault; rape]

pieceinthepuzzlehumanity:

campaignofdistractions:

“The monetary cost for a rape victim to receive treatment at a hospital in the United States.

This should be fucking free.

Actually, in almost every state, it is free to the victim. Usually, it’s paid by the state’s Victims Assistance Program and/or covered by their Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner program if the victim doesn’t have health insurance that will cover it. You can also opt to not use your health insurance (for example, for college students who don’t want their parents to find out) if needed.

Additional medications, if needed afterwards, are also paid for by the Victims Assistance Program as well. 

Edited to Add: I hate when these things get reblogged without commentary that lets victims of sexual assault know that there are options. I would hate if someone saw something like this on tumblr and decided not to seek medical treatment, get tested, or get any necessary medications because they are under the false impression that they will have to pay $4.5k for these services.

^Very important commentary.

I’ve seen this reblogged more without this commentary than with.

258,062 notes

pitted-cherries:

The pictures above are from Project Unbreakable.

Project Unbreakable was created in October of 2011 by an amazing woman named Grace Brown. In her own words, Grace “works with survivors of sexual assault, photographing them holding a poster with a quote from their attacker. Grace has photographed over a hundred people, and received over eight hundred submissions.” She has a really wonderful, short video about why she does the work that she does. I encourage you all to watch.

I was so incredibly moved by this project. The first time I stumbled upon it, I started crying. I empathized with these women and men so viscerally; if not through the incident itself, through the sentiments behind it. So I selected a handful of really powerful photos that deeply resonated with me, and that I hope will resonate with others, too.

After some thought, I’ve decided that I want to become a part of this movement and help to shed light on the issue of sexual violence. Particularly, highlighting the fact that most rapes are committed by someone who is at least an acquaintance of the survivor, and I feel that these photos and perpetrator quotes communicate that message very effectively. So, with that said, here is my Project Unbreakable submission:

Snapshot 20120714

I’m not in a place yet where I feel comfortable showing my face, and I have to keep reminding myself that there is no shame in that. When I’m ready, I’m ready. And this still feels like a big step for me. I really appreciate Grace and Project Unbreakable for inspiring me to take this risk.

-Sarah

42,820 notes