And now we have Lego’s new girl range. In this article in Bloomberg Businessweek, it is clear that Lego’s has done exhaustive  work trying to understand what has kept girls from playing with them  before and what would make Lego’s more attractive to girls. As my  friend, Michele, from Princess Free Zone made clear in her excellent post on this topic, perhaps girls don’t see Lego’s as attractive because  since 2005, as stated in the Business Week article, the company has been  aiming straight at boys. Hmm….maybe girls don’t really have to have  pastel colored blocks, curvier minifigures, and hair salons to build.  Perhaps, just consider the idea, they just need to actually see ads  featuring girls playing with these toys. Perhaps, girls simply have been  shown very clearly one too many times that this product is “for boys.”  Perhaps, girls have been so inundated with this idea that everything has  to be gendered that they have bought it hook line and sinker. Girls  used to play with Lego’s without there having to be any discernible  differences. As this Lego’s ad from the 80′s shows, the company promoted  the product to both girls and boys as fun building sets. Listen, girls  like to build! I recently interviewed 5 young women at a high school for  technology, math, and science who were all in the robotics club and  went to competitions with the robots that they had built. And here’s  something else you need to know, none of the pieces were pastel colored.  These girls loved building their robot because they like using their  minds to solve problems and create things, just like the boys in their  classes, and they didn’t need it to be color coded to enjoy it.

And now we have Lego’s new girl range. In this article in Bloomberg Businessweek, it is clear that Lego’s has done exhaustive work trying to understand what has kept girls from playing with them before and what would make Lego’s more attractive to girls. As my friend, Michele, from Princess Free Zone made clear in her excellent post on this topic, perhaps girls don’t see Lego’s as attractive because since 2005, as stated in the Business Week article, the company has been aiming straight at boys. Hmm….maybe girls don’t really have to have pastel colored blocks, curvier minifigures, and hair salons to build. Perhaps, just consider the idea, they just need to actually see ads featuring girls playing with these toys. Perhaps, girls simply have been shown very clearly one too many times that this product is “for boys.” Perhaps, girls have been so inundated with this idea that everything has to be gendered that they have bought it hook line and sinker. Girls used to play with Lego’s without there having to be any discernible differences. As this Lego’s ad from the 80′s shows, the company promoted the product to both girls and boys as fun building sets. Listen, girls like to build! I recently interviewed 5 young women at a high school for technology, math, and science who were all in the robotics club and went to competitions with the robots that they had built. And here’s something else you need to know, none of the pieces were pastel colored. These girls loved building their robot because they like using their minds to solve problems and create things, just like the boys in their classes, and they didn’t need it to be color coded to enjoy it.

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